Call (Four Zero Five) 722-0866 to talk about The Urantia Book or find a local study group to attend

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Compare 02/15/2018

There is always more goodness in the world than there appears to be, because goodness is of its very nature modest and retiring.
  --Evelyn Beatrice Hall, biographer (1868-1956)

(195:5.12)  As you view the world, remember that the black patches of evil which you see are shown against a white background of ultimate good. You do not view merely white patches of good which show up miserably against a black background of evil.

    Evelyn Beatrice Hall who wrote under the pseudonym S. G. Tallentyre, was an English writer best known for her biography of Voltaire entitled The Life of Voltaire, first published in 1903. She also wrote The Friends of Voltaire, which she completed in 1906.
    In The Friends of Voltaire, Hall wrote the phrase: "I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it" (which is often misattributed to Voltaire himself) as an illustration of Voltaire's beliefs. Hall's quotation is often cited to describe the principle of freedom of speech.

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Superuniverse Speculations

Friends,

The newly expanded and improved edition of Superuniverse Speculations on the Scale of Orvonton has just been released on Amazon. Among many editorial changes, I have added a new chapter exploring problems and possibilities about the cosmography of Splandon, our major sector. All the chapters, especially nebulae classification, have been improved and edited to make a much more comprehensive superuniverse speculative overview.

What I have done is to explore every conceivable speculation about what comprises Orvonton. I attempt to leave no stone unturned in trying to understand and reconcile epochal revelation with modern astronomy. No study yet has been as in-depth as this book seeks to accomplish.

If you are curious about cosmology and the Urantia Book, then this book should be in your Urantia library.

This is a fascinating study, and I hope it will attract the attention of Urantia book believers who are curious about the beauty of revealed cosmology and our place in our cosmic loving home.

You can order the book on Amazon. Type “tom allen superuniverse” into Google, and you can find the book easily.

Contact me at tommykaren1@att.net if you have any comments or want a pdf version of the book.

Tom Allen

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Compare 02/12/2018

History is all explained by geography.
  --Robert Penn Warren, novelist and poet (1905-1989)

(63:5.1) The early Andon races did not penetrate very far into Asia, and they did not at first enter Africa. The geography of those times pointed them north, and farther and farther north these people journeyed until they were hindered by the slowly advancing ice of the third glacier.

(64:1.1) Primitive man made his evolutionary appearance on earth a little less than one million years ago, and he had a vigorous experience. He instinctively sought to escape the danger of mingling with the inferior simian tribes. But he could not migrate eastward because of the arid Tibetan land elevations, 30,000 feet above sea level; neither could he go south nor west because of the expanded Mediterranean Sea, which then extended eastward to the Indian Ocean; and as he went north, he encountered the advancing ice. But even when further migration was blocked by the ice, and though the dispersing tribes became increasingly hostile, the more intelligent groups never entertained the idea of going southward to live among their hairy tree-dwelling cousins of inferior intellect.

(65:2.15) Later in the evolutionary unfolding of intelligence, the lemur ancestors of the human species were far more advanced in North America than in other regions; and they were therefore led to migrate from the arena of western life implantation over the Bering land bridge and down the coast to southwestern Asia, where they continued to evolve and to benefit by the addition of certain strains of the central life group. Man thus evolved out of certain western and central life strains but in the central to near-eastern regions.

    Robert Penn Warren (April 24, 1905 – September 15, 1989) was an American poet, novelist, and literary critic and was one of the founders of New Criticism. He was also a charter member of the Fellowship of Southern Writers. He founded the influential literary journal The Southern Review with Cleanth Brooks in 1935. He received the 1947 Pulitzer Prize for his novel All the King's Men (1946) and the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1958 and 1979. He is the only person to have won Pulitzer Prizes for both fiction and poetry.

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Compare 02/08/2018

Between the idea
And the reality
Between the motion
And the act
Falls the shadow.
  --T.S. Eliot, poet (1888-1965)

(1:6.1) Human personality is the time-space image-shadow cast by the divine Creator personality. And no actuality can ever be adequately comprehended by an examination of its shadow. Shadows should be interpreted in terms of the true substance.

(12:8.16) The brighter the shining of the spiritualized personality (the Father in the universe, the fragment of potential spirit personality in the individual creature), the greater the shadow cast by the intervening mind upon its material investment. In time, man's body is just as real as mind or spirit, but in death, both mind (identity) and spirit survive while the body does not. A cosmic reality can be nonexistent in personality experience. And so your Greek figure of speech—the material as the shadow of the more real spirit substance—does have a philosophic significance.

(44:0.15)  To material beings the spirit world is more or less unreal; to spirit beings the material world is almost entirely unreal, being merely a shadow of the substance of spirit realities.

    Thomas Stearns Eliot, OM (26 September 1888 – 4 January 1965) was a British essayist, publisher, playwright, literary and social critic, and "one of the twentieth century's major poets". He moved from his native United States to England in 1914 at the age of 25, settling, working, and marrying there. He eventually became a British subject in 1927 at the age of 39, renouncing his American passport.
    Eliot attracted widespread attention for his poem "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" (1915), which was seen as a masterpiece of the Modernist movement. It was followed by some of the best-known poems in the English language, including The Waste Land (1922), "The Hollow Men" (1925), "Ash Wednesday" (1930), and Four Quartets (1943). He was also known for his seven plays, particularly Murder in the Cathedral (1935) and The Cocktail Party (1949). He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1948, "for his outstanding, pioneer contribution to present-day poetry".

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Compare 02/01/2018

Neither great poverty nor great riches will hear reason.
  --Henry Fielding, author (1707-1754)

(196:2.8) Jesus blessed the poor because they were usually sincere and pious; he condemned the rich because they were usually wanton and irreligious. He would equally condemn the irreligious pauper and commend the consecrated and worshipful man of wealth.

    Henry Fielding (22 April 1707 – 8 October 1754) was an English novelist and dramatist known for his rich, earthy humor and satirical prowess, and as the author of the picaresque novel Tom Jones. Additionally, he holds a significant place in the history of law enforcement, having used his authority as a magistrate to found (with his half-brother John) what some have called London's first police force, the Bow Street Runners. His younger sister, Sarah, also became a successful writer.

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Pipeline of Light

This is from Michelle Klimesh, PIPELINE OF LIGHT reporter.

Our Society contributes to this worthy cause, and you may too individually.

December 31, 2017

Dear Friends,

In the final quarter of 2017, our Pipeline of Light volunteers placed two hundred, ninety-seven copies of The Urantia Book into seventeen countries. Your donations to the Pipeline helped us deliver books to readers and study groups in Argentina, Mexico, Venezuela, the United States, Spain, Kenya, Peru, New Zealand, Ghana, Guatemala, Australia, South Africa, Croatia, Chile, Canada, and Columbia. 

We’ve also added another new country: Republic of the Congo.  Books sent out this quarter include sixty-nine English books, one Portuguese, and two hundred, twenty-two Spanish translations.  

The current efforts bring our Pipeline all-time totals to seven thousand, eight hundred and fifty-three copies of The Urantia Book placed into ninety countries around the world. Many thanks to the wonderful volunteers who keep this flow of books moving into the world for us!

We deeply appreciate the contributions of our volunteers and our donors.  If you would like to contribute to this work, donations can be made online at: 

http://urantiabook.org/urantia-book-store/contributions

or by mail to:

The Urantia Book Fellowship, PO Box 6631, Broomfield, CO  80021

Thank you so much for your support. 

Michelle Klimesh, Pipeline Reporter

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Compare 01/2/2018

Men are often capable of greater things than they perform. They are sent into the world with bills of credit, and seldom draw to their full extent.
  --Horace Walpole, novelist and essayist (1717-1797)

(48:7.4) Few persons live up to the faith which they really have.

(48:7.6)  Few mortals ever dare to draw anything like the sum of personality credits established by the combined ministries of nature and grace. The majority of impoverished souls are truly rich, but they refuse to believe it.

(28:6.5)  The Memory of Mercy discloses the moral debt of the children of mercy—their spiritual liabilities—to be set down against their assets of the saving provision established by the Sons of God. In revealing the Father's pre-existent mercy, the Sons of God establish the necessary credit to insure the survival of all. And then, in accordance with the findings of the Significance of Origins, a mercy credit is established for the survival of each rational creature, a credit of lavish proportions and one of sufficient grace to insure the survival of every soul who really desires divine citizenship.

(28:6.7) The Memory of Mercy must show that the saving credit established by the Sons of God has been fully and faithfully paid out in the loving ministry of the patient personalities of the Third Source and Center. But when mercy is exhausted, when the "memory" thereof testifies to its depletion, then does justice prevail and righteousness decree. For mercy is not to be thrust upon those who despise it; mercy is not a gift to be trampled under foot by the persistent rebels of time. Nevertheless, though mercy is thus precious and dearly bestowed, your individual drawing credits are always far in excess of your ability to exhaust the reserve if you are sincere of purpose and honest of heart.

    Horatio Walpole, 4th Earl of Orford (24 September 1717 – 2 March 1797), also known as Horace Walpole, was an English art historian, man of letters, antiquarian and Whig politician.
    He had Strawberry Hill House built in Twickenham, south-west London, reviving the Gothic style some decades before his Victorian successors. His literary reputation rests on the first Gothic novel, The Castle of Otranto (1764), and his Letters, which are of significant social and political interest. They have been published by Yale University Press in 48 volumes.
    He was the son of the first British Prime Minister Sir Robert Walpole. As Horace Walpole was childless, on his death his barony of Walpole descended to his cousin of the same surname, who was created the new Earl of Orford.

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Compare 01/22/2018

I should dearly love that the world should be ever so little better for my presence. Even on this small stage we have our two sides, and something might be done by throwing all one's weight on the scale of breadth, tolerance, charity, temperance, peace, and kindliness to man and beast. We can't all strike very big blows, and even the little ones count for something.
  --Arthur Conan Doyle, physician and writer (1859-1930)

(100:4.6) You cannot truly love your fellows by a mere act of the will. Love is only born of thoroughgoing understanding of your neighbor's motives and sentiments. It is not so important to love all men today as it is that each day you learn to love one more human being. If each day or each week you achieve an understanding of one more of your fellows, and if this is the limit of your ability, then you are certainly socializing and truly spiritualizing your personality. Love is infectious, and when human devotion is intelligent and wise, love is more catching than hate. But only genuine and unselfish love is truly contagious. If each mortal could only become a focus of dynamic affection, this benign virus of love would soon pervade the sentimental emotion-stream of humanity to such an extent that all civilization would be encompassed by love, and that would be the realization of the brotherhood of man.

    Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle KStJ, DL (22 May 1859 – 7 July 1930) was a British writer best known for his detective fiction featuring the character Sherlock Holmes. Originally a physician, in 1887 he published A Study in Scarlet, the first of four novels about Holmes and Dr. Watson. In addition, Doyle wrote over fifty short stories featuring the famous detective.
    The Sherlock Holmes stories are generally considered milestones in the field of crime fiction. Doyle is also known for writing the fictional adventures of Professor Challenger and for propagating the mystery of the Mary Celeste. He was a prolific writer whose other works include fantasy and science fiction stories, plays, romances, poetry, non-fiction and historical novels.

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Compare 01/17/18

Spurned pity can turn into cruelty just as spurned love turns into hate.
  --Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach, writer (1830-1916)

(177:4.11) And every mortal man knows full well how love, even when once genuine, can, through disappointment, jealousy, and long-continued resentment, be eventually turned into actual hate.

(188:5.2)  True love does not compromise nor condone hate; it destroys it.

    Baroness Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach was an Austrian writer. Noted for her excellent psychological novels, she is regarded—together with Ferdinand von Saar—as one of the most important German-language writers of the latter portion of the 19th century.

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LA Society Request

Hi fellow Urantia Book Society Leaders, 

We are hoping you will take a few minutes to complete this questionnaire to help us grow our Society.

Please click on the link below to complete this form.
https://form.jotform.com/73515534889166

Thank you!
The Urantia Book Los Angeles Society

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